Did Ancient Egyptians Have Technology Far Beyond the Current? A Look at the Schist Disk

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While modern theorists have designed several engineering scenarios to explain how the Egyptians may have accomplished such incredible feats as the construction of the pyramids and the Great Sphinx, for example, other accomplishments remain within the real

Since first encountered by westerners, the pyramids of Egypt seemed too many to be far beyond the technological and engineering capabilities of such a “primitive” and “less advanced” culture.

In recent years, this belief has led to a growing number who support the assumption that the ancient Egyptians must have been provided advanced technological knowledge via aliens from beyond our solar system.

While this assertion lacks any credibility with the modern scientific community, there can be no denying that the Egyptians did succeed in technological accomplishments that should have been beyond their abilities--according to our modern worldview.

Although modern theorists have offered several engineering scenarios to explain how the Egyptians may have accomplished such incredible feats as the construction of the pyramids and the Great Sphinx, for example, other extraordinary accomplishments remain within the realm of, “How could they possibly have conceived and accomplished that?”

Case in point, the so-called “Schist Disk

Discovered by Egyptologist Brian Walter Emery in 1936 at Saqqara (or Sakkara), located at the entrance of the Nile Delta and just west of Memphis, the Schist Disk was uncovered while excavating the tomb of Prince Sabu, the son of Adjuib Pharaoh, governor of the First Dynasty (circa 3,000 BCE).

While uncovering numerous funerary objects from the site, Emery’s attention was drawn to an object that he initially defined in his report, the Great Tombs of the I Dynasty, as "a container in the form of a schist bowl.”

Schists, derived from the Greek word σχ?ζειν meaning "to split,” (referring to the ease with which this material can be split along the lateral plane in which the platy minerals lie), are a category of medium-grade metamorphic rocks notable for the preponderance of what are termed “lamellar” minerals such as micas, chlorite, talc, hornblende, and graphite.

Derived from clays and mud which have passed through a series of metamorphic processes (involving the production of shale, slate, and phyllite during the intermediate steps), most schists are mica, but graphite and chlorite are also widely found. Schist is characteristically foliated, meaning the individual mineral grains split off easily into flakes or slabs.

Approximately 61 cm in diameter (24 inches), one cm thick, and 10.6 cm (4.2 inches) in the center, the Schist Disk was crafted by an unknown method from this very fragile and delicate material--the production of which would confound many artists even today.

Resembling a plate or a concave steering wheel of a car, it has three cuts or curved "shovels" that resemble the helix of a boat, and in the center is an opening with a rim that seems to act as the outside receiver of some axis of a wheel or some other unknown mechanism; conceivably, a central hub designed to fit onto a pole.

Image credit

Housed in the first wing of the Egyptian Museum of Cairo, the Disk is currently labeled  an “incense container,” although there is no evidence--or consensus--whatsoever to support this assertion.  What is certain, however, is that by this early time in history, stone carving was apparently a sophisticated skill, far beyond what had ever been imagined.

While most every archaeologist feels compelled to offer an opinion as to what purpose the Disk served, its futuristic design continues to baffle any Egyptologist who has had the opportunity to study it at any length. Thus, a satisfactory explanation has yet to be provided.

Adding to the mystery (and alien-related supposition) is the well documented belief that the introduction of the wheel in Egypt didn’t occur until the invasion of the Asiatic group known as the Hyksos at the end of the Middle Kingdom, around 1640 BCE. They used it on a number of mechanisms, but primarily on their military chariots.

Image credit

Thus, the questions that arise are: If the Schist Disk is not a wheel, nor modeled after a wheel, what is it?

How could a culture who typically used chisels to shape rock have mastered a technique to work such a delicate material to this extraordinary level?

And perhaps most importantly, why would they invest the time and skills needed to create this object unless it served a very important, specific purpose?

Be that as it may, the Schist Disk, which has been dated to at least 3000 BCE, continues to constitute one of the most perplexing Egyptian and ancient mysteries, providing fodder for all those who refuse to believe that such an advanced piece of technology could have been conceived and created by such an ancient culture--without celestial help.

References:

Unforbidden-geology.com

The Tomb of Sabu

They Mysterious Egyption Tro-Lobed Disk

Egypt Library Archive

Extreme Egyptian Masonry

http://www.ancient-wisdom.co.uk/egypt.htm (cool site)

Images via wikipedia.org unless credited otherwise (with my sincere gratitude)

Related Articles:

Egyptian Make-up

>  The Egyptian Book of the Dead

Egypt Under Ramses II

>  Egypt Under Akhenaton

>  The Pyramid at Abu Rowash

>  The Rosetta Stone

>  The Palermo Stone

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