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Tips on Cooking With Wines

Wine can do a fantastic job in giving a savory flavor to bland food without loading too much of the dreaded calories. ItÂ’s almost miraculous if you know how to do it right. The secret lies in the cooking; all of the alcohol calories evaporate, leaving behind only a few caloriesÂ’ worth of flavor and sugar.

Wine can do a fantastic job in giving a savory flavor to bland food without loading too much of the dreaded calories. It’s almost miraculous if you know how to do it right. The secret lies in the cooking; all of the alcohol calories evaporate, leaving behind only a few calories’ worth of flavor and sugar.

Wine does wonders to enhance the subtleties of fish, chicken, and veal. As a marinade, it has an unmatched quality of effective tenderizing the least fattening cuts of pork, beef, or lamb. Wine romanticizes vegetables, especially salads; and wine turns plain fruit to a decadent dessert.

Don’t pass up this opportunity to cook for you family using wines. There’s no need to worry because wine turns non-alcoholic when cooked with food. The alcohol evaporates with the calories. Only the flavor remains.

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Here are some tips for cooking with wines:

  • Dry wines are the best ones to use for cooking. Red wines like claret, Burgundy, and Chianti, or white wines like dry sherry, Chablis, Rhine, or sauterne—or even some dry vermouth from your cocktail-mixing stock.
  • You don’t need to spend a lot of money on your kitchen wine shelf. Even the inexpensive “jug” wines will do very nicely.
  • Cooking with wines need not be troublesome – try stirring a little sauterne into a simmering chicken broth to make a “Continental Consommé,” or dashing Burgundy on burgers as they broil. Add a tablespoonful or two to transform canned tomato sauce.
  • Wine is a wonderful tenderizer and a natural marinade for those extra lean cuts of meat, such as flank steak, beef round, leg of lamb or veal chops. These meats lack the fatty marbling that adds tenderness.
  • To add an extra spike to your slow-simmer stews or ragouts, use wine in place of water, bouillon, broth, juice, or whatever liquid your favorite recipe calls for – or use it half and half.
  • For party-mood desserts, poach peaches, pears, or any kind of favorite fruit in wine. You may also marinade them in wine while dinner is being served. Just remember that uncooked wine desserts still contain alcohol, but looking at the brighter side, “tipsied fruit” is lot less fattening than layer cake aside from being exotic tasting enough to help you forget the normally served after dinner sweets.
  • There are no hard and fast rules about which wine you can cook with what. For starters, you might prefer using red wines in red meats, robust sauces, and spicy dishes. White wines may be used for light sauces, seafood, poultry, or veal courses. But you may try to experiment with the different flavors, too.

 

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Comments (7)

I LOVE cooking! Thanks for the information, it's a great article.

That was a wonderful share.

Cooking Good Athena, many thanks.

Great tips, will definitely try some!

Will definitely try this! Hope my husband would love it :)

Sediment

I always taste wine before I cook with it. Nothing to do with flavor - it just numbs the fear of cooking.

Sediment

I always taste wine before I cook with it. Nothing to do with flavor - it just numbs the fear of cooking.

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