katherine daisy

@katherinekatherine
10
Reputation
0
Answers
5
Questions
20
Profile views
katherine daisy asked a question: — 1 week ago
Stronger Security and Disaster Planning Fuel Healthcare's Migration to the CloudNew  cost reductions make cloud options more compelling than ever but, in a  twist, experts say cloud platforms can be more secure than managed data  centers.Healthcare did not lead the charge into the cloud.  But it has been making up for lost time. The use of cloud platforms has  grown substantially within healthcare provider organizations.A recent HIMSS Analytics survey of provider C-suite executives found that more than half are using Infrastructure-as-a-Service (Iaas) cloud platforms to provide an environment for a wide range of uses ranging from hosting  internally developed programs to a running fully functional EHR.HIPAA  privacy and security concerns were one reason for the slow start. But  once HHS provided clear guidance on how to address PHI issues and work  through Business Associate (BA) relationships, everything changed.Today,  very few healthcare CIO’s consider security a reason to avoid the  cloud. Quite the opposite. The HIMSS Analytics survey found that  disaster preparedness is now one of the leading reasons why healthcare  CIO’s are making the decision to shift resources onto cloud platforms.  The savings are compelling. Why rent storage in a redundant data center  to maintain a fully functioning backup when you can pay for only what  you need in the cloud?“You don't have to worry about your infrastructure and data center,”  said Jason Bickford, Applications Director of Health Information  Management Systems at Banner Health and president of the HIMSS Arizona  Chapter. “Cloud-based is the right way to go.”Disaster recovery  in the cloud also has value as a stepping stone on the way to moving  production-level clinical applications into a cloud environment. The  logic is compelling. Once the backup clinical application has been  confirmed to be running smoothly in parallel, the cloud option has  proved itself reliable, so why not take advantage of the potential  savings?That is not to say that security isn’t a priority. After  budget limitations, HIMSS Analytics survey respondents cited security  concerns as a reason to move slowly toward the cloud.“Regardless  of whether a solution is hosted in your own data center or in the  cloud, security should be a critical factor in your review,” advises  Susan Snedaker, Director, IT Infrastructure & Operations at Tucson  Medical Center and author of the book IT Security Management. “There’s  nothing inherently more or less secure about a cloud option, but some  cloud-based solutions may not meet today’s stringent security  requirements.”In selecting a cloud platform vendor, Snedaker  advises a careful review of the vendor’s documentation and contracts.  Pay attention to the provider’s security program and make sure that  audits take place on a regular basis.“If your database is going  to be hosted on the same server as another database from another  company, what happens if the other database is attacked? Can the  attacker then gain access to your data?” Snedaker says. “Be sure to  understand the specifics of the hosting solution so you are clear about  your vulnerabilities. Then take steps to mitigate them – select a  different solution, select a different hosting model, ask the vendor to  modify policies, processes, procedures, access methods, etc. or accept  the risk if it cannot be overcome and there are no better options.”Security  consultant Tod Ferran of Halock Security Labs has performed audits of  the large cloud platforms, Microsoft, Amazon and Google, and found the  services are maintaining a very high level of security. “In many ways,”  Ferran said, “the cloud is a better choice because many hospitals can’t  afford the staff to make their systems secure enough.”As the  nature of risk has changed, so has the value equation. Strong security  means constant maintenance of operating systems and applications with  the healthcare enterprise. HIT managers can gain peace of mind from  knowing the updates are being performed by a vendor that is guaranteeing  round-the-clock support, rather than by a hospital staff already  stretched with aggressive internal project loads.Many healthcare  providers use multiple cloud vendors, cherry picking among the  different options to align with specific demands of each application.“Organizations  are not putting all their eggs in one basket,” said Sandra Yu, cloud  client executive at CDW. “It’s a multi-cloud world.” CDW partners with a  wide number of cloud hosts in providing managed cloud services ,  so Yu has experience with many vendors.“If  you have needs for hyper computing, we would recommend a public  hyper-scalar for that,” she said. For PHI she would recommend a private  cloud.When it comes to applications that have a heavy  computational workload, you need to be sensitive to the cloud’s latency  and so she would recommend a cloud data center that is geographically  closer. But for something that is not PHI-sensitive, she would recommend  a public cloud where the costs should be lower.“The clinical  apps that can work well in the cloud are typically those that are not  transferring large files or data streams,” Snedaker says. “If you’re  going to host a data intensive clinical application in the cloud, you  should be sure you have the right connectivity solution in place.”When  factoring in all of the reasons to move to the cloud, in the end, cost  is still a prime motivation. The savings are derived not only from  reducing the cost of maintaining data centers. The pricing for IaaS  continues to go down.“It’s like a race to the bottom,” Yu said,  noting that when one of the major vendors lowers its price, the others  are quick to match it. Pricing among the leading public cloud vendors is  generally on par now, so decisions should be made after shopping for  the services and support that you’ll need. Pay as you go options are  readily available, so trials are simple to setup.This Article Source  is From :  http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/stronger-security-and-disaster-planning-fuel-healthcares-migration-cloud
katherine daisy asked a question: — 1 week ago
Stronger Security and Disaster Planning Fuel Healthcare's Migration to the CloudNew  cost reductions make cloud options more compelling than ever but, in a  twist, experts say cloud platforms can be more secure than managed data  centers.Healthcare did not lead the charge into the cloud.  But it has been making up for lost time. The use of cloud platforms has  grown substantially within healthcare provider organizations.A recent HIMSS Analytics survey of provider C-suite executives found that more than half are using Infrastructure-as-a-Service (Iaas) cloud platforms to provide an environment for a wide range of uses ranging from hosting  internally developed programs to a running fully functional EHR.HIPAA  privacy and security concerns were one reason for the slow start. But  once HHS provided clear guidance on how to address PHI issues and work  through Business Associate (BA) relationships, everything changed.Today,  very few healthcare CIO’s consider security a reason to avoid the  cloud. Quite the opposite. The HIMSS Analytics survey found that  disaster preparedness is now one of the leading reasons why healthcare  CIO’s are making the decision to shift resources onto cloud platforms.  The savings are compelling. Why rent storage in a redundant data center  to maintain a fully functioning backup when you can pay for only what  you need in the cloud?“You don't have to worry about your infrastructure and data center,”  said Jason Bickford, Applications Director of Health Information  Management Systems at Banner Health and president of the HIMSS Arizona  Chapter. “Cloud-based is the right way to go.”Disaster recovery  in the cloud also has value as a stepping stone on the way to moving  production-level clinical applications into a cloud environment. The  logic is compelling. Once the backup clinical application has been  confirmed to be running smoothly in parallel, the cloud option has  proved itself reliable, so why not take advantage of the potential  savings?That is not to say that security isn’t a priority. After  budget limitations, HIMSS Analytics survey respondents cited security  concerns as a reason to move slowly toward the cloud.“Regardless  of whether a solution is hosted in your own data center or in the  cloud, security should be a critical factor in your review,” advises  Susan Snedaker, Director, IT Infrastructure & Operations at Tucson  Medical Center and author of the book IT Security Management. “There’s  nothing inherently more or less secure about a cloud option, but some  cloud-based solutions may not meet today’s stringent security  requirements.”In selecting a cloud platform vendor, Snedaker  advises a careful review of the vendor’s documentation and contracts.  Pay attention to the provider’s security program and make sure that  audits take place on a regular basis.“If your database is going  to be hosted on the same server as another database from another  company, what happens if the other database is attacked? Can the  attacker then gain access to your data?” Snedaker says. “Be sure to  understand the specifics of the hosting solution so you are clear about  your vulnerabilities. Then take steps to mitigate them – select a  different solution, select a different hosting model, ask the vendor to  modify policies, processes, procedures, access methods, etc. or accept  the risk if it cannot be overcome and there are no better options.”Security  consultant Tod Ferran of Halock Security Labs has performed audits of  the large cloud platforms, Microsoft, Amazon and Google, and found the  services are maintaining a very high level of security. “In many ways,”  Ferran said, “the cloud is a better choice because many hospitals can’t  afford the staff to make their systems secure enough.”As the  nature of risk has changed, so has the value equation. Strong security  means constant maintenance of operating systems and applications with  the healthcare enterprise. HIT managers can gain peace of mind from  knowing the updates are being performed by a vendor that is guaranteeing  round-the-clock support, rather than by a hospital staff already  stretched with aggressive internal project loads.Many healthcare  providers use multiple cloud vendors, cherry picking among the  different options to align with specific demands of each application.“Organizations  are not putting all their eggs in one basket,” said Sandra Yu, cloud  client executive at CDW. “It’s a multi-cloud world.” CDW partners with a  wide number of cloud hosts in providing managed cloud services ,  so Yu has experience with many vendors.“If  you have needs for hyper computing, we would recommend a public  hyper-scalar for that,” she said. For PHI she would recommend a private  cloud.When it comes to applications that have a heavy  computational workload, you need to be sensitive to the cloud’s latency  and so she would recommend a cloud data center that is geographically  closer. But for something that is not PHI-sensitive, she would recommend  a public cloud where the costs should be lower.“The clinical  apps that can work well in the cloud are typically those that are not  transferring large files or data streams,” Snedaker says. “If you’re  going to host a data intensive clinical application in the cloud, you  should be sure you have the right connectivity solution in place.”When  factoring in all of the reasons to move to the cloud, in the end, cost  is still a prime motivation. The savings are derived not only from  reducing the cost of maintaining data centers. The pricing for IaaS  continues to go down.“It’s like a race to the bottom,” Yu said,  noting that when one of the major vendors lowers its price, the others  are quick to match it. Pricing among the leading public cloud vendors is  generally on par now, so decisions should be made after shopping for  the services and support that you’ll need. Pay as you go options are  readily available, so trials are simple to setup.This Article Source  is From :  http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/stronger-security-and-disaster-planning-fuel-healthcares-migration-cloud
katherine daisy asked a question: — 1 week ago
Stronger Security and Disaster Planning Fuel Healthcare's Migration to the CloudNew  cost reductions make cloud options more compelling than ever but, in a  twist, experts say cloud platforms can be more secure than managed data  centers.Healthcare did not lead the charge into the cloud.  But it has been making up for lost time. The use of cloud platforms has  grown substantially within healthcare provider organizations.A recent HIMSS Analytics survey of provider C-suite executives found that more than half are using Infrastructure-as-a-Service (Iaas) cloud platforms to provide an environment for a wide range of uses ranging from hosting  internally developed programs to a running fully functional EHR.HIPAA  privacy and security concerns were one reason for the slow start. But  once HHS provided clear guidance on how to address PHI issues and work  through Business Associate (BA) relationships, everything changed.Today,  very few healthcare CIO’s consider security a reason to avoid the  cloud. Quite the opposite. The HIMSS Analytics survey found that  disaster preparedness is now one of the leading reasons why healthcare  CIO’s are making the decision to shift resources onto cloud platforms.  The savings are compelling. Why rent storage in a redundant data center  to maintain a fully functioning backup when you can pay for only what  you need in the cloud?“You don't have to worry about your infrastructure and data center,”  said Jason Bickford, Applications Director of Health Information  Management Systems at Banner Health and president of the HIMSS Arizona  Chapter. “Cloud-based is the right way to go.”Disaster recovery  in the cloud also has value as a stepping stone on the way to moving  production-level clinical applications into a cloud environment. The  logic is compelling. Once the backup clinical application has been  confirmed to be running smoothly in parallel, the cloud option has  proved itself reliable, so why not take advantage of the potential  savings?That is not to say that security isn’t a priority. After  budget limitations, HIMSS Analytics survey respondents cited security  concerns as a reason to move slowly toward the cloud.“Regardless  of whether a solution is hosted in your own data center or in the  cloud, security should be a critical factor in your review,” advises  Susan Snedaker, Director, IT Infrastructure & Operations at Tucson  Medical Center and author of the book IT Security Management. “There’s  nothing inherently more or less secure about a cloud option, but some  cloud-based solutions may not meet today’s stringent security  requirements.”In selecting a cloud platform vendor, Snedaker  advises a careful review of the vendor’s documentation and contracts.  Pay attention to the provider’s security program and make sure that  audits take place on a regular basis.“If your database is going  to be hosted on the same server as another database from another  company, what happens if the other database is attacked? Can the  attacker then gain access to your data?” Snedaker says. “Be sure to  understand the specifics of the hosting solution so you are clear about  your vulnerabilities. Then take steps to mitigate them – select a  different solution, select a different hosting model, ask the vendor to  modify policies, processes, procedures, access methods, etc. or accept  the risk if it cannot be overcome and there are no better options.”Security  consultant Tod Ferran of Halock Security Labs has performed audits of  the large cloud platforms, Microsoft, Amazon and Google, and found the  services are maintaining a very high level of security. “In many ways,”  Ferran said, “the cloud is a better choice because many hospitals can’t  afford the staff to make their systems secure enough.”As the  nature of risk has changed, so has the value equation. Strong security  means constant maintenance of operating systems and applications with  the healthcare enterprise. HIT managers can gain peace of mind from  knowing the updates are being performed by a vendor that is guaranteeing  round-the-clock support, rather than by a hospital staff already  stretched with aggressive internal project loads.Many healthcare  providers use multiple cloud vendors, cherry picking among the  different options to align with specific demands of each application.“Organizations  are not putting all their eggs in one basket,” said Sandra Yu, cloud  client executive at CDW. “It’s a multi-cloud world.” CDW partners with a  wide number of cloud hosts in providing managed cloud services ,  so Yu has experience with many vendors.“If  you have needs for hyper computing, we would recommend a public  hyper-scalar for that,” she said. For PHI she would recommend a private  cloud.When it comes to applications that have a heavy  computational workload, you need to be sensitive to the cloud’s latency  and so she would recommend a cloud data center that is geographically  closer. But for something that is not PHI-sensitive, she would recommend  a public cloud where the costs should be lower.“The clinical  apps that can work well in the cloud are typically those that are not  transferring large files or data streams,” Snedaker says. “If you’re  going to host a data intensive clinical application in the cloud, you  should be sure you have the right connectivity solution in place.”When  factoring in all of the reasons to move to the cloud, in the end, cost  is still a prime motivation. The savings are derived not only from  reducing the cost of maintaining data centers. The pricing for IaaS  continues to go down.“It’s like a race to the bottom,” Yu said,  noting that when one of the major vendors lowers its price, the others  are quick to match it. Pricing among the leading public cloud vendors is  generally on par now, so decisions should be made after shopping for  the services and support that you’ll need. Pay as you go options are  readily available, so trials are simple to setup.This Article Source  is From :  http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/stronger-security-and-disaster-planning-fuel-healthcares-migration-cloud
katherine daisy asked a question: — 2 months ago
People who bet on horse races know that the most reliable information about a horse will come from those who are closest to that horse -- a trainer or someone working in the stable. The idiom, straight from the horse’s mouth, implies that someone has gotten even better information – a tip from the horse itself!Over the past two months, I’ve been writing articles about common public cloud concerns and why hybrid IT gives you the right mix of public cloud, private cloud, and on-premises solutions. Of course, I don’t expect you to take my word for it. But maybe you will take advice from those who tried public cloud and have since moved to hybrid IT.In this article, I’ve complied a few quotes from a variety of organizations of all sizes and industries. Each has experienced public cloud and now has moved to hybrid IT. So here you go – advice that is straight from the horse’s mouth:Public cloud performance issues“We’re moving some of our web infrastructure workloads back to our own data center. Performance was the big issue. Lack of communication from our public cloud provider led to a customer-facing outage we could not have prevented. Now we’re seriously rethinking our entire cloud strategy and are moving more workloads back on-prem.” – Social media company“We’re bringing back apps that we had put on the public cloud and didn’t go as planned because of reduced performance when compared to … when they were on-prem. That said, there are other apps we feel are truly more cloud-ready, and we’re trying those out in the cloud so we can have what we deem to be a truly hybrid solution.” – Financial Services companyPublic cloud cost concerns“We opted to be bleeding-edge and move to cloud when storage and hypervisor license costs were on the climb. It seemed to be a better way to keep costs in an opex mode and know what they were. That worked slightly at first. … We used a lot of IaaS and SaaS within AWS. … As we grew, the usage did too … and the bills grew far faster. … We honestly reached a tipping point when billing started to approach $100,000 per month. … We had good financial outcomes moving on-prem with a hybrid solution so we can access cloud when we choose. … We now have two times the horsepower on-prem for half the cost.” – Social Media company“One of the biggest issues driving declouding for us is that, to be honest, the initial move to the public cloud was done willy-nilly. We moved the workloads and then we moved the apps to run off those workloads. But we didn’t really think about how to stage properly, how to control usage costs, and how to design an exit strategy. We quickly learned that cloud costs were far higher than we expected.” – Retail companyPublic cloud control concerns“Flexibility is important. With a private cloud, we get the control and flexibility of a dedicated environment that’s tailor-made to address our specific IT needs. For fast-growing companies like ours with constantly changing requirements, a private cloud offers more flexibility to adapt and evolve as the company changes.” – Social Media company“The data we hosted on AWS was growing exponentially, as all data does, and that increased costs. Public cloud hosting served its purpose when we entered the all-cloud (for the most part) approach, but then you hit this point where it doesn’t make financial or operational sense any longer, when the same thing can be accomplished on-prem for less money and less hassle. … Having the workloads back on-site gave us better control over usage, and we could better see spikes in activity.” – Public Sector companyThe benefits of Hybrid ITMany businesses have already started to move beyond the public cloud – into a new era of hybrid IT that combines public cloud, private cloud and traditional IT. New offerings such as hyperconverged and composable infrastructure offer cloud-like capabilities on-premises – solutions that can provide businesses more control, greater performance, less cost, and less risk than many public cloud options. A combination of on-premises, software-defined options within a private cloud seamlessly combined with public cloud lets businesses build the best possible infrastructure for their individual workloads.“The lower cost of storage, servers, and even better servers that require less hypervisor licenses made it less costly than it once was to scale out a data center or private cloud on-site.” – Energy companyOrganizations all over the world are taking a closer look at their applications and deciding which ones should be in the public cloud and which ones should remain on traditional IT or a private cloud. Although performance, cost and control issues are all relevant, you should also consider the business model of each workload in your decision.HPE has assembled an array of resources to help you transition to a brand-new hybrid IT world. You can learn more about HPE composable infrastructure powered by Intel® by reading the e-book, HPE Synergy for Dummies, or learn about HPE’s approach to hybrid cloud by checking out the HPE website, Project New Hybrid IT Stack. And to find out how HPE can help you determine a workload placement strategy that meets your service level agreements, visit HPE Pointnext.This Article Source is From : http://www.infoworld.com/article/3212833/data-center/from-public-cloud-to-hybrid-it-straight-from-the-horse-s-mouth.html
katherine daisy asked a question: — 2 months ago
The public cloud computing sector is in a constant state of evolution, as vendors design new IT infrastructure architectures and service providers deploy them in their own unique hyperscale data centre facilities.According to the latest analysis of cloud pricing by 451 Research, for the majority of new applications, a serverless solution offers a lower total cost of ownership (TCO) than both virtual machines (VMs) or containers.Severless cloud market developmentWhen analyzing serverless offerings from the leading public cloud service providers, 451 Research determined that IBM generally offers the least expensive service, with Microsoft leading for certain other configurations.According to the 451 Research assessment, the TCO of serverless tends to be lower than VMs, even when the VM is hosting containers, because there is no need for developers to provision, configure and manage the infrastructure.As an example, when a serverless function is active for just three quarters of the month, it only takes a 10-minute saving in operational overhead for serverless to beat virtual machines on TCO.451 Research analysts believe that even without the savings in developer time, the ability of serverless to increase utilisation means it is cheaper than using VMs when the code is executed fewer than 500,000 times each month.451 Research finds that IBM is least expensive for 0.1 second duration scripts, and Azure is cheapest for 10-second scripts - assuming memory requirements match predetermined size allocations.Besides, IBM offers a distinct cost advantage by allowing users to choose exact memory requirements, whereas other cloud service providers round up the figures, resulting in users typically paying for unused capacity.That being said, and considering the similarities in pricing methods and offerings between cloud service providers, 451 Research believes serverless is poised to undergo a round of price cutting this year."Serverless is more than just hype; it has the potential to transform the way we develop, build and run applications in the cloud. Understanding the economics of serverless technology is vital to understanding its potential to disrupt the industry," said Owen Rogers, research director at 451 Research.Outlook for serverless cloud servicesFreemium serverless offerings are already fueling the growth of new services by stimulating experimentation and helping enterprises gain skills. In the analyst's opinion, this could result in serverless solutions becoming the next cloud 'price war' battleground.451 Research expects adoption of serverless - or FaaS (functions as a service) - to continue growing over the next few years. In its 2016 market study, 37 percent of the IT decision-makers surveyed were already using serverless technology.The term 'serverless' implies that no servers are used to run an application or service. But in reality, this model means that developers and cloud service providers do not encounter the typical complexity and maintenance management of VMs or containers.Salesforce and Cloud Computing related Updates Like our page and follows us at @solunusincArticle Source is From : https://www.cloudcomputing-news.net/news/2017/jul/10/why-serverless-cloud-solutions-will-reduce-it-costs/