Airfare Daily Deals eCigarettes Eyeglasses Hotels Jewelry Online Backup Online Dating Online Printing Online Tickets Skin Care Textbook Rentals Vitamins Web Hosting Weddings
Get reviews, comparisons, and deals for popular retailers and brands
SEARCH

List of Norse Gods: Dagr, Delling, Eir, Forseti

Dagr was Norse god of daytime, or rather, a personification of "day" as it was written in the Poetic Edda. Dagr was son to Dellingr and Nótt, the personified god of the night. He would ride a chariot accross the sky between dawn and dusk, dragged by the Skinfaxi, a bright-manned horse.

This multi-part article is supposedly* a complete list of all Norse Gods and Goddesses, each with a paragraph, a descriptor, and/or an external reference following the listed item. Otherwise, it could be that the list item is yet to be updated, rewritten, or there is just insufficient reference information to be found on anywhere.

(Previous: List of Norse Gods: Baldr, Borr, Bragi, Búri…)

Dagr:

Dagr: Old Norse meaning day, also Dag, or Dagur. Dagr was Norse god of daytime, or rather, a personification of "day" as it was written in the Poetic Edda. Dagr was son to Dellingr and Nótt, the personified god of the night. He would ride a chariot accross the sky between dawn and dusk, dragged by the Skinfaxi, a bright-manned horse.

In Old Norse works of literature, Dagr appeared as if a common noun simply meaning "day."

Dellingr:

Dellingr: Old Norse meaning the dayspring, or the shining one. Dellingr was attested in Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, both compiled in the 13th century and the legendary Hervarar saga ok Heiðreks. In all accounts, Dellingr is pictured as father to Dagr, the personified god of day, and a third husband to Nótt, the personified goddess of the night.

Schollars offer that Dellingr was probably the personified dawn, and that his name could be both an English surname, or a place name.

Eir:

Eir: Old Norse for help or mercy. It was never clear if Eir was really a goddess of a Valkyrie. Valkyries are one of Odin's twelve orders of handmaids. However, there are Eir is attested several times over in the Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, in the skaldic poetry, and in a runic inscription from Bergen; whereas she was associated with medical skills.

Sholars are torn whether the three sources were portraying the same figure, Eir, or two different figures: one a goddes, the other a Valkyrie. There are all sorts of theories revolving around her. Could she be just a form of the goddess Frigg? Was she a goddess in the first place? Or was she just being compared to teh Greek goddess Hygiea?

Forseti:

Forseti: Old Norse meaning the presiding one, or "president" in Modern Icelandic and Faroese. Forseti was an Æsir god of justice and reconciliation. As attested in the Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda, Forseti was the son of Baldr to Nanna. His home was in Glitnir: a realm that means "the shining," or it could have been giving reference to Glitnir's silver ceiling and golden pillars. The pillars would radiate light that could be seen from a distance.

Forseti does not only appear in Norwegian mythology. He is in fact also identified as Forsite: The god of the Frisians. Note that if Forseti's sacred island was Helogoland, it can't be too surprising that he was a deity both known to Frisians and Scandinavians. However, it remains a mystery why Forseti was never mentioned in any of Saxo Grammaticus' literature.

(Next: List of Norse Gods: Freyja, Freyr, Frigg, Fulla, Gmot, Hel…)

Need an answer?
Get insightful answers from community-recommended
experts
in Religion & Spirituality on Knoji.
Would you recommend this author as an expert in Religion & Spirituality?
You have 0 recommendations remaining to grant today.
Comments (0)
ARTICLE DETAILS
RELATED ARTICLES
ARTICLE KEYWORDS