Home Brands Products Deals Promo Finder Store Features Forums Add Review What's Knoji? Sign Up Login

Your Hobby Reflects Your Career in the Future

Knoji reviews products and up-and-coming brands we think you'll love. In certain cases, we may receive a commission from brands mentioned in our guides. Learn more.
Three men who recently applied for executive training in the London office of an international oil company all had the same level of education and seemed to have an equal chance of getting the job they were expecting. After several hours of questions and

Three men who recently applied for executive training in the London office of an international oil company all had the same level of education and seemed to have an equal chance of getting the job they were expecting. After several hours of questions and tests, however, the interviewers finally chose one man for the job. The secret of this choice was that he had the right hobbies.

Hobby and Your Jobs

Today, hobbies are an important key in discovering the character and capabilities of people looking for jobs. Indeed, much research over the past three years has shown psychologists that what a person does in his spare time can help them find out what his character is like. These are the results of intensive tests conducted by Dr. Paul Boynton with 5,000 children from over 300 schools throughout the United States Prof. Boynton is an expert in child intelligence at New York’s Columbia University.

His findings showed that boys who collected things had the highest I.Q. (Intelligence Quotient), while those with no hobbies or interests of any hind had an I.Q. that was lower than normal. Furthermore, he showed that stamp collectors were usually brighter and more advanced than the boys who collected such things as matchboxes or cigarette packets.

“A postage stamp is like a painting, with color and design. With stamps, you see different languages and money values, geography and world history,” explains Dr. Theodore Bretscher, a famous psychologist from Innsbruck University. “Therefore stamp collectors are in contact with various types of knowledge.” People who are really interested in life, says Bretscher, have at least two hobbies.

Three Groups

Psychologists used a long check-list with questions on topics ranging from mountain climbing to playing cards. Their findings can be put into three groups:

Group one: people who have active, athletic, mechanical or scientific hobbies are usually well-adjusted, are friendly with most people and take life as it comes. Group two: people interested in hobbies like reading, listening to music or playing a musical instrument are generally sensitive and intelligent but tend to be too serious in life. Group three: people who are interested in model engineering, making tiny airplanes, the like are usually less stable than those of group one, but more stable than those in the second group and have firm confidence in life.

What is your hobby?

What is your hobby? It’s probably in the following list. Read through it and see if you agree with the psychologists. If you like working in the garden, or making furniture, you’re probably a relaxed, easy going person who proud of doing things and finds pleasure in small things. An interest in astronomy, geography, travel or archaeology means that you are well-balanced, mature, and love outdoor activities. A liking for music and books means you may be a little sensitive, easily made sad and often more easily influenced by your feelings than by reason. It may be hard for a person of this type to control his emotion and tolerate small troubles but he is usually a thoughtful and willing listener, with a keen sense of humor.

People who breed animals or enjoy fishing are quiet and passive, yet strong and furious in their struggle for the success of their job or their future. Active sports like sailing, cycling, climbing, running and soccer normally attract people who like competition and are usually materialistic (it needn’t always be in bad sense), yet are good-natured, industrious and brave. People who like to draw or paint are usually gay and optimistic but often over-sensitive. They have a lot of energy and enjoy new sights and personalities, but tend to jump from one thing to another.

No wonder that industry thinks hobbies are important keys to character and personality. Dr. Bretscher explains: “The method of choosing a worker is becoming so complex that what you do in your own time is as important to an employer as what you do in his, that is, in working time.”

0 comments

About This Article

Yanto Yulianto

Explore Top Fitness Gear & Equipment Brands

Expand more
Top-ranked fitness gear & equipment brands