Why is Steel More Elastic Than Rubber According to Physics

Knoji reviews products and up-and-coming brands we think you'll love. In certain cases, we may receive a commission from brands mentioned in our guides. Learn more.
Elasticity is a very interesting word. It came into everyday vocabulary from science, and has acquired a meaning that is totally opposite to the original meaning.

Elasticity is a very interesting word. It came into everyday vocabulary from science, and has acquired a meaning that is totally opposite to the original meaning.

Elasticity According To Physics: Elasticity, as everyone understands, is the property of being stretched and restored. In physics they have discovered that almost all solids have this property. If they are stretched (with a certain limit, of course) they lengthen. On removing the force, they go back to their original shape.

In fact, stretching is not the only thing that can be done. One can stretch, shear, compress, and do many things with force to alter the shape of a solid body. Each time the body returns to the original shape and position after this force is removed. This property of materials to yield to deforming forces, only to come back to the normal shape after the forces are removed is called "elasticity".

Liquids and gases have no permanent shape, and they do not go back to the original shape because they have no shape of their own. However, they can be compressed to decrease their volume. As soon as the forces of compression are removed, they go back to their original volume. Thus even liquids and gases do exhibit what is called volume-elasticity.

The Value Of Elasticity: Physics tries to put everything into measurable quantities. This quantification helps accurate comparison of two things. For example, if the elasticity of different materials is quantified, just a look at those quantities will show which material is more elastic and which one is less.

To quantify elasticity, physics defines elasticity as "resistance to change". The greater the resistance to change, the greater is the elasticity of the material and the faster it comes back to its original shape or configuration when the deforming force is removed. By this definition, steel is more elastic than rubber because steel comes back to its original shape faster than rubber when the deforming forces are removed.

Elasticity In Physics And In Common Life: In common life we label a substance as more elastic if it can be stretched more than others. In physics a substance is labeled more elastic if it offers greater resistance to deformation than other bodies, so that it can be stretched less than others.

The fundamental difference between the definition in physics and definition in common life should always be kept in mind when one speaks of elasticity. Else one is likely to leave his listeners/readers totally confused. Please remember, the more a body can be stretched or deformed without breaking it, the more elastic it is called in common language. Coming to physics, the less a body can be stretched or deformed without breaking it, the more elastic it is considered in physics.

28 comments

Dilip Singh yadav
10
Posted on Jan 15, 2019
CHARLESTON AZONWU EDOZIE
0
Posted on Sep 22, 2014
Anthony Davis
0
Posted on Jun 29, 2014
CHARLESTON AZONWU EDOZIE
0
Posted on Jan 13, 2014
John Mwafise
0
Posted on Oct 31, 2013
Eduardo Diaz
0
Posted on Aug 4, 2012
David Young
0
Posted on Nov 18, 2011
Guest
Posted on Oct 29, 2011
Dr. Johnson C Philip
0
Posted on Oct 18, 2011
Danny Franklin
0
Posted on Oct 16, 2011
Guest
Posted on Sep 27, 2011
Coleman Robison
0
Posted on Aug 27, 2011
Bill Morgan
0
Posted on Jul 12, 2011
Guest
Posted on Feb 5, 2011
Bobbie Sparks
0
Posted on Jan 15, 2011
Guest
Posted on Dec 24, 2010
Guest
Posted on Nov 21, 2010
Guest
Posted on Nov 21, 2010
Guest
Posted on Nov 21, 2010
thestickman
0
Posted on Sep 9, 2010
saimonita paongo
0
Posted on May 4, 2010
Martin S. K. BONSU
0
Posted on Apr 30, 2010
Stanton Winder
0
Posted on Apr 28, 2010
Chikwe Oluge
0
Posted on Apr 21, 2010
Cameron Grysen
0
Posted on Apr 19, 2010
laurie Wright
0
Posted on Apr 18, 2010
Solomon Rotifa
0
Posted on Apr 15, 2010
lisa leverton
0
Posted on Apr 15, 2010