Tai Chi Works for Seniors

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Tai chi combines a type of meditative relaxation process and proper breathing with flowing graceful movements, which results in benefits to both the power of the body and the mind. While tai chi attracts people of all ages, tai chi can be especially benef

TAI CHI WORKS FOR SENIORS

Tai Chi Chuan is one of the finest legacy of Chinese culture, it is very rich both martial and healing art. People practice Tai Chi for various reasons, some are attracted by its martial appeal as an esoteric and deadly art, and others are drawn to it because of its artistic movements. But to most, the reason is the promise of health benefits through its dedicated practice. However, tai chi exercises themselves are fluid, smooth and soothing, making practicing tai chi for seniors a perfect addition to their daily routines.

Tai chi combines a type of meditative relaxation process and proper breathing with flowing graceful movements, which results in benefits to both the power of the body and the mind. While tai chi attracts people of all ages, tai chi can be especially beneficial to those who have arthritis, are recovering from injuries or have difficulties in working with any but the lowest impact exercises.

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As a slow and low impact exercise these movements will put minimal pressure on your joints and tendons. Even if tai chi is a low impact exercise does not mean that you will not get physical health benefits. For example, practicing tai chi regularly can improve your cardiovascular health. One of the results of a healthier cardiovascular system can be lowered blood pressure and a regular practice of tai chi balances the blood pressure.

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An Olympic Day in Lanier Village Estates

Many seniors are worried and concerned about loosing their balance and falling. Tai chi can help to improve balance. Studies indicate that seniors who practice tai chi regularly are less likely to fall than those who do not practice tai chi. In addition to balance, tai chi can help improve range of motion and flexibility. Many people also report that practicing tai chi can help control pain.(In China, monks who practice Qigong and Taichi can control pain)

Another health benefit of tai chi is getting a better night's sleep. Not only will you be able to sleep better, but you should feel more relaxed throughout the day and be able to cope with stress more effectively.

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Tai Chi Practice in Binondo, Manila

Tai chi does not have to be extremely expensive. You do not have to buy special equipment or go anyplace in particular to practice your tai chi routine. You may also be able to learn tai chi at your local senior center, YMCA or YWCA at reduced costs.

Tai chi can be a social activity. If you learn tai chi with others in a class setting, you will meet people who have a common interest. You may be able to form a group that practices together regularly outside of class and then enjoys a chat afterwards.

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Many seniors here in the Philippines, especially Chinese, practices tai chi almost everyday, every morning in the park. Some of them range from late 70s to early 80s and some of them are young adults too. Some of them were couples and they even join competition according to ages.

There are many places in the country where tai chi is being practiced. In Metro-Manila, different schools conduct tai chi and qigong practice. Most popular parks are the Quezon City Circle Park and the Luneta Park where tai chi exercise are regularly held and this is where I joined them.

Reference:

Ronthoughts Journal – Internal Martial Arts

http://popularmanila.blogspot.com/2011/01/where-to-find-tai-chi-and-qigong.html

http://www.life123.com/health/fitness/tai-chi/tai-chi-for-seniors.shtml

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