Review of The Wasp That Wanted to Be a Bee and Other Silly Poems

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The battle of insects against beasts is reported in a straight fashioned antidote without attempts at a guffaw. But, readers have the picture of the insects attacking the brute and might think it funny as many cartoons have since depicted the act since t

The tiny pamphlet was published in 2007 by Outskirts Press, Inc, a publishing house located in Denver, Colorado.  The book opens with a prelude by the author Nora Katsourakis Anthony.  "I have written poetry since I was in grade school and have been writing poetry all my life.  These poems are a natural extension of me.  Please accept these poems as a play on words.  I hope I do not offend anyone and that my readers find enjoyment in them. "

The pamphlet's first poem is a natural epic.  By natural epic I am supposing a long poem about the heroic actions of the main character who happens to be an insect.  Of course, one might argue that the "The Wasp That Wanted to Be a Bee" qualifies as a fable but since the author can't be Aesop and reads more like Homer, I am giving it a description as a natural epic about a wasp.  The tradition of wasps is found in ancient Greek writing beginning with Aristophanes, a Greek farce called The Wasps.  Like Aristophanes, the author Nora Katsourakis Anthony is also Greek and, perhaps, quoting from one of his plays, κωμбїіδοδιδασκαλОЇαν εбј¶ναι χαλεπПЋτατον бј”ργον бјЃπО¬ντων might also apply. 

If , I, may be as forward to translate being Greek myself, "comedy is fruitless accomplishment without rewards". 

The comedy in The Wasp That Wanted to Be a Bee is not obvious but implied.  A bee stinging the read end of a great big grizzly bear is, of course, funny.  Here is how it is written, on page 4 of the book,

          Forgetting the dance, the bees went straight for the bear, He merely growled and brushed the air with them.  Their stingers were ineffective against the big black bear.  ...

          Out of the air, seemingly from nowhere, Wally the wasp came stinging with a vengeance.

The battle of insects against beasts is reported in a straight fashioned antidote without attempts at a guffaw.  But, readers have the picture of the insects attacking the brute and might think it funny as many cartoons have since depicted the act since this natural epic has been in cirulation since 1963 and only published in a tiny anthology in 2007 with other poems like the last one, "I am Exhausted".

Much of the literative implications used by Nora Katsourakis Anthony are implied rather than obtuse or to put it in the vernacular, suggested rather than hit over the head with a pie.

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