Ornamental Cherry Tree Selection

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When you think of cherry trees people think of the red fruit, George Washington, and weeping cherry trees, but there are several varieties of ornamental cherry trees that will enhance the look of your property. Cherry trees belong to the rose family (Rosa

When you think of cherry trees people think of the red fruit, George Washington, and weeping cherry trees, but there are several varieties of ornamental cherry trees that will enhance the look of your property. Cherry trees belong to the rose family (Rosaceae) and the Prunus genus. Most cherry trees produce attractive blossoms in the spring, and some will produce fruits in the summer. When selecting ornamental cherry trees, consider the blossom type and color, as well as the mature size and area of the country where they will perform best.

Sargent cherry

Sargent cherry trees bloom a pale pink to white flowers in early spring which then produce small, bright red fruits.  They can grow 30 feet tall and are hardy to Zone 4. Sargent cherry trees also provide brilliant red-orange foliage in autumn.  There are single and double flowering varieties.

Single-bloom Sargent Cherry

Double-bloom Sargent Cherry

Kwanzan Cherry Tree

The Kwanzan flowering cherry tree produces eye-catching pink double blooms with some varieties that have a peony-like bloom. This fast-growing tree can reach heights of 40 feet. Unlike other cherry trees, the Kwanzan's foliage begins growing while the tree is in bloom. The crown is symmetric and forms in a vase-like shape. Kwanzan has inconspicuous fruit and will not attract any wildlife. The tree is short-lived with a lifespan of only 15-25 years, so Kwanzan is not a permanent solution.

Kwanzan Cherry Tree

Okame Cherry Tree

The Okame cherry tree produces pink blooms early in the spring. This tree grows 20-30 feet in height making it a good choice for small lots. The Okame cherry tree grows at a rate of 1-2 feet per year in moist, well-drained soil, but will adapt to a variety of soils as long as they are not wet. The tree has red, yellow and orange foliage in autumn and insignificant fruit.

Okame Cherry Tree

Yoshino Cherry Tree

The Yoshino cherry tree is one of the smaller varieties, reaching a height of 25 to 40 feet. It has clusters of white flowers in the spring, followed by golden foliage in the autumn. It's a good choice for row planting. This variety of cherry tree is part of the Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C. The Yoshino blooms in mid-March to early April depending on weather conditions. The bloom time is only about 6 to 10 days. The tree prefers full sun and is hardy in Zones 5 through 8.

Yoshino Cherry trees in Washington D.C.

Yoshino Cherry Trees

Snow Fountain Weeping Cherry Tree

One of the most spectacular varieties of ornamental cherry trees, the Snow Fountain weeping cherry tree has dipping branches that reach the ground. The tree has clusters of white or pink blossoms in late March. Weeping cherry trees are typically slow to moderate growers, and this variety has a height of 12 to 15 feet and a spread of 15 to 20 feet. The tree does well in Zones 5 to 8 and can handle acidic, clay, loamy, sandy, and well-drained locations. It can also tolerate moderate drought.

Snow Fountain Weeping Cherry Tree

Weeping Higan Cherry Tree

A taller variety of weeping cherry, the Higan can reach heights of 25 to 40 feet and can handle many different soil conditions. It prefers moist soils and has a fast growth rate. The Higan Weeping Cherry grows best in Zones 5 to 8. This tree has pink double-blooms and inconspicuous fruit.  The dark green foliage turns orange in autumn.

Higan Weeping Cherry Tree

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