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Objective Types of Test: Guidelines for Writing Completion Questions and True-False Questions

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In the completion test, sentences are presented from which certain works have been omitted. The learner is to fill in the blank to complete the meaning. The primary purpose of the test (true-false questions) is to measure what learners know not how lucky
               objective type tests

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Completion Questions

These are useful in evaluating the learners' thinking at the lower cognitive levels of knowledge and comprehension. It is usually difficult to prepare completion items capable of testing higher level thinking abilities of the learners. Some authorities in administering tests believe that it is not easy to construct items with one correct logical answer.

In the completion test, sentences are presented from which certain works have been omitted. The learner is to fill in the blank to complete the meaning. This type of short-answer question, sometimes called a fill-in-the-blank question, is suitable for measuring a wide variety of content. Although it usually tests recall of information, it can also demand thought and ability to understand relationships and make influences.

Guidelines for Writing Completion Questions

  • The direction "Fill in the blanks" is usually sufficient, but the student should be informed about how detailed the answer should be.
  • Do not use statements that are copied from the textbook or workbook, since this encourages memorization.
  • Fill-in-items should be clearly worded to avoid unexpected responses.
  • The completion part should be near the end of the item.
  • It is simpler and clearer to write the completion item as question than as a statement.
  • There should be only one possible correct answer.
  • The correct responses should not be part of a particular grammatical form, common expression, or well-known saying. An item such as "Give me liberty or give me _____" is a famous American revolutionary slogan which should be avoided."
  • Use one blank, or certainly no more than two, in any item, since more than two blanks lead to confusion and ambiguity.
  • The required completion should be specific term (person, place, object or concept), since an item requiring a more general phrase may elicit more subjective responses and be harder to score.

True-False Questions

These are generally used to assess knowledge level thinking. They can be prepared and graded relatively quickly. The weakness of this type of test is the tendency of guessing. The primary purpose of the test is to measure what learners know not how lucky they are.

Guidelines for Writing True-False Questions

  • Each true-false item should test an important concept or piece of information, not just a specific date or name. The knowledge being tested should be significant.
  • True-false statements should be completely true of false, without exception.
  • The intended correct answer should be clear only to a knowledgeable person.
  • Avoid specific determiners and absolute statements (never, only, none, or always) since they are unintentional clues. Most important, do not use them in statements you want to be considered true.
  • Avoid qualifying statements and words that involve judgment and interpretation (few, most, or usually). Most important, do not use them in statements you want to be considered false.
  • Avoid negative statements and double negatives, since they confuse students and may cause knowledgeable students to give the wrong answer.

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Posted on Jul 15, 2011

About This Article

Levy Dalumpines

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