FLOWER Tattoo Tips and Design Guide

Knoji reviews products and up-and-coming brands we think you'll love. In certain cases, we may receive a commission from brands mentioned in our guides. Learn more.
Explore helpful tips and guidance on different types of flower tattoos from shoulder or arm pieces to exquisite full length body pieces.

Flower tattoos are a very popular choice not only among women but also men, but some designs leave a little to be desired. In this article, I'll be featuring popular design images along with helpful tips on choosing the appropriate color, size and placement that best features these beautiful permanent works of art.

Colors

Colors that often fade quickest are warmer tones such as reds, yellows, some whites and oranges. Touch ups over time are expected for tatoos that contain a lot of surface area using these colors. On the other hand, using them as accents as shadow, fading into other colors or blends that are intentional can be a nice touch and won't be as noticeable if the color tends to fade over time. On the other hand, strong colors that tend to last over time are the cooler color tones such as greens, purple, blue, black and deep browns.  

Romantic and Simple

Image Source

Image Source

For those who enjoy adding a little bit without overdoing it may find small flowers with a little bit of vine or leaves a great way to go. Placing the design behind the ear as shown above, or on the ankle or even inside of the wrist makes the tattoo visible to others but doesn't scream tattoo! For those who want to simplify it even more or add a softer color and texture could benefit from adding flowers without the vines. Black is a strong color for any style of tattoo even in small amounts. It makes the design more defined and visible even if it is small. On the other hand, without a darker outline, some colors may tend to look a little faded or blurry, especially if the color of ink used fades over time.

Image Source

A great compromise is using a design without black, but with using colors that are least likely to fade, that also have enough of a shadow to light contrast so that the image doesn't appear undefined where it appears to lack detail.

Large Single Flower Designs

Image Source

Image Source

Image Source

Image Source

With large single tattoo designs, detail is absolutely key. Covering a large area of skin, sloppy designs with little shading and overwhelming singular color tones can take away from the elegance, beauty and life that the tattoo could have. Using contrasting colors or at least color ranges that blend into multiple shades offer more dimension and depth to the design. Especially for women who choose large designs, adding a lot of depth and detail keeps the image tasteful, even if it covers a large area of skin. The more pleasing to the eye, the more likely the design will remain attractive into the senior years of life.

Clusters, Vines and Intricate Detail

Image Source

Image Source

Image Source

With large areas of the skin that are covered in flower designs, adding other details, textures, and contrasting colors really makes the design pop. For tattoos such as one featured above that is mostly black and shades of black and grey, details is key. Without proper shading, the tattoo could be a real challenge to the eye and will likely need retouching at a later time to add more depth and shadow. A great balance between shadow and light really makes the details visible, especially over time as the skin will tend to change due to the aging process.

Also, with large designs such as the ones featured above in which there is a lot of color and detail, it's important to take into consideration the proper tattoo placement on the body. Gaining weight, scarring or even favorite pieces of clothing can end up distorting the shape and design of the tattoo so it's important when considering getting a design done that is this large, to take into consideration the aging process so that regardless of how the body changes, the tattoo is likely to hold its shape and remain well proportioned. Arms, legs and shoulders tend to be a better choice although some choose the back. If the person should gain weight or fluctuate with weight, it will compliment them best to place the tattoo where the skin will least likely stretch.

For women who expect to become pregnant, placing these large tattoos in other areas aside from the stomach region will prevent the need for corrective retouching due to stretch marks and changes in the skin.

Covering Scars

Image Source

Tattoo design created to cover a double mastectomy scar.

Tattoo design created to cover tummy tuck scar.

Image Source

A popular solution to anxiety or insecurity over surgical or injury related scars are flower tattoos among other styles and designs. The key is to create a natural flow that conceals the scar without enhancing it even more due to lines, shapes or lack of full coverage.

Real Life Sizing

As with any tattoo, and especially ones where detail matters, choosing a design that is first drawn out or printed out in real size that can be overlayed on the body where the tattoo is desired will help to eliminate last minute changes that the tattoo artist may have to make which can compromise what the person wanted or expected out of the design.

Time Spent in the Chair

What's really important to consider is the amount of time you expect to be in the chair getting your tattoo. Most tattoos are created through multiple sessions. The skin and underlying muscle, when traumatized, tends to contract and react to the needle. So, it is common to have to split up tattoo sessions in order to yield the best results, especially if there is a lot of bleeding or swelling that can compromise true color and outlines for the artist.

Expect that your design may take longer than just one session so even if you do the design in segments, it can make it more convenient. For example, with the large cluster style designs, doing them in segments can work better than going in to have an entire outline done, then weeks later some color, then later on shading. Splitting up the sections with full work done on each section can be more pleasing to the eye and to the wallet. Tattoos are very expensive and the more color and detail that is added, the lengthier and more expensive the investment.

Do Your Research

Looking through a tattooists portfolio of course is a great way to examine their body of work. But it's also good to double check with the Better Business Bureau to be sure there are no claims against the tattooist and that they have a good reputation. Also, if they have a website that lists testimonials is a good source but overall, word of mouth speaks for itself. Do the research to find the best of the best. It will be worth it. Tattoo removal is expensive and painful and some designs cannot be completely fixed. So choose wisely and if the parlor is unsanitary, or if anything appears out of place such as discovering the tattooist is intoxicated, choose another location.

Prep the Surface

If you are getting a tattoo on an area of your body that is overly hairy, shave first but do it at least several hours prior to the appointment to avoid skin irritation. Make sure your skin is not saturated with lotion or oil. This will make ink saturation and absorption more difficult and the chances are higher for needing retouches.

Know What You're Getting Into

We all hear the stories of someone whose been intoxicated and woke up to find a tattoo on their body that was in obvious poor taste. Or, by being intoxicated, the chances of bleeding more is higher. Be clear of mind and body. If nerves are an issue, try light hypnosis or doing the design with a friend who can offer moral support. Cleanliness, sanitation, sterilization of equipment and coherence of both the artist and patron are best.  

 

5 comments

jesseka kris
0
Posted on Nov 2, 2012
Debbie Edwards
0
Posted on Jan 28, 2012
Chris Stonecipher
0
Posted on Jan 28, 2012
Debbie Edwards
0
Posted on Jan 27, 2012
Yovita Siswati
0
Posted on Jan 27, 2012