Facts About the River Wear (U.K)

Knoji reviews products and up-and-coming brands we think you'll love. In certain cases, we may receive a commission from brands mentioned in our guides. Learn more.
facts about the River Wear, source of the River Wear, course of the River Wear, tributaries of the River Wear, bridges that span the River Wear, attractions along the River Wear, the River Wear Basin, weirs on the River Wear, docks on the River Wear, plac

The River Wear has its source on Burnhope Seat, a moor situated along the two thousand, nine hundred foot high Cross Fell, situated on the eastern slopes of the Pennine Mountain Range in County Durham, England. The river travels in an easterly direction for sixty miles before it enters the North Sea at Sunderland.

The river begins life as a series of small streams, two of which make up the Killhope and Burnhope Burns, before forming the River Wear proper at Wearhead, where the river goes on to make it’s way along the Weardale Valley, an area which incorporates part of the seventy mile long Weardale Way walking path and the eighteen mile long Weardale Valley Railway, all of which make up part of the North Pennines AONB - Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. 

The river proceeds through both bleak moorland and the rolling, green hills of what was County Durham's once thriving industrial areas, where today the remains of it's former coal, iron and lead mines and limestone and dolerite quarries are no longer in evidence.  

The river flows through the market town of Stanhope, where it runs along the route of the Weardale Valley Railway line, the market town of Wolsingham, the town of Bishops Auckland, where it passes the 12th century Auckland Castle, home of the Bishops of Durham, Auckland Deer Park and Binchester Roman Fort. It goes on to flow through the city of Durham where it passes the city's UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Durham Castle and Durham Cathedral, the town of Chester - le - Street where it passes the thirteenth century Benedictine, Finchdale Priory, the town of Washington, where it forms part of the Washington Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust Reserve, the suburbs of the City of Sunderland, where evidence of the city’s past industrialisation and former shipyards are still in evidence, before eventually flowing into the North Sea between the city's Roker Pier and New South Pier to form part of the Port of Sunderland’s harbour basin.

5 comments

Kathleen Murphy
0
Posted on Mar 17, 2012
Jessie Agudo
0
Posted on Feb 18, 2012
Abdel-moniem El-Shorbagy
0
Posted on Feb 15, 2012
+Paulose
0
Posted on Feb 13, 2012
M 5446
0
Posted on Feb 13, 2012