Chocolate Hills: A Natural Wonder

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One of the beautiful natural wonder in the Philippines is the chocolate hills. Chocolate Hills is located in Bohol, Philippines, is a cone-shaped hills which are symmetrical. However, from all over the hill, there is the highest hill with a height of al

CHOCOLATE HILLS: A NATURAL WONDER

One of the beautiful natural wonder in the Philippines is the cchocolate hills.

Chocolate Hills is located in Bohol, Philippines, is a cone-shaped hills which are symmetrical. However, from all over the hill, there is the highest hill with a height of almost 400 meters. Chocolate Hills consist of 1,268 hills, covered by grasses, with the type of grass that is hard. It is a very interesting tour for all seasons but best in summertime, because one can see its color for its name. It was an amazing sight. My last visit was summer of 2002.

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If one visits the Philippines, a time in Chocolate Hills in Bohol, one can see the origin for the conical form of the Chocolate Hills as described in popular terms on the bronze plaque at the viewing deck in Carmen, Bohol. This plaque states that they are eroded formations of a type of marine limestone that sits on top of hardened clay.

The plaque reads: "The unique land form known as the Chocolate Hills of Bohol was formed ages ago by the uplift of coral deposits and the action of rain water and erosion."

The plaque also makes reference to a fanciful explanation of the origin of the Chocolate Hills that is unsupported by any published scientific research, when it states: The grassy hills were once coral reefs that erupted from the sea in a massive geologic shift. Wind and water put on the finishing touches over hundreds of thousands of years.

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Self-published, popular web pages present a variety of fanciful and less credible explanations about how these hills formed. They include sub-oceanic volcanism; limestone covered blocks created by the destruction of an active volcano in a cataclysmic eruption; coral reefs that were raised from the sea as the result of a massive geologic shift; and tidal movements. The lack of any exposed or associated volcanic rocks anywhere in the Chocolate Hills refutes the popular theories involving volcanic eruptions. These theories involving either a sudden, massive geologic shift, coral reefs being erupted from the sea, or tidal movements lack any collaborating evidence and support among geologists.

The Chocolate Hills are Bohol’s most famous tourist attraction. They look like giant mole hills, or as some say, women's breasts, and remind us of the hills in a small child's drawing.

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THE VIEWING DECK

Most people who first see pictures of this landscape can hardly believe that these hills are not a man-made artifact. However, this idea is quickly abandoned, as the effort would surely surpass the construction of the pyramids in Egypt.

The chocolate hills consist of are no less than 1268 hills (some claim this to be the exact number). They are very uniform in shape and mostly between 30 and 50 meters high. They are covered with grass, which, at the end of the dry season, turns chocolate brown. From this color, the hills derive their name. At other times, the hills are green, and the association may be a bit difficult to make.

Legend has it that the hills came into existence when two giants threw stones and sand at each other in a fight that lasted for days. When they were finally exhausted, they made friends and left the island, but left behind the mess they made.

For the more romantically inclined is the tale of Arogo, a young and very strong giant who fell in love with an ordinary mortal girl called Aloya. After she died, the giant Arogo cried bitterly. His tears then turned into hills, as a lasting proof of his grief.

However, up to this day, even geologists have not reached consensus on how they where formed. The most commonly accept theory is that they are the weathered formations of a kind of marine limestone on top of a impermeable layer of clay. If you climb the 214 steps to the top of the observation hill near the complex, you can read this explanation on a bronze plaque, as I mentioned above.

Reference:

http://www.luzpalma.com/Chocolate%20Hills%20in%20Bohol.html

http://www.bohol.ph/article6.html

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