Animals That Cry Just Like Humans

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Animals do cry just like humans though the reason for crying might differ from that of humans.

Crying, as much as it does have its benefits, is not always carried out on impulse but for a variety of reasons. Whether by humans or any other animals; there is always a reason for crying. Why do humans cry? Humans cry when they lose a loved one to death; when they are heartbroken; when they are filled with joy; etc. Humans have a variety of reasons for crying.

But, have you ever wondered if animals cry? Do animals really cry; and why?

In the first instance, let’s make one thing very clear. Animals do cry; and for a variety of reasons just like humans. In this article we will answer the questions and clarify the fact that animals do cry; and we will look into some instances of animals that actually cry.

Actual cases of animals crying

All animals can shed tears. Tears are an important protection and lubricant for the eyes. They flush out irritants and keep the eyes wet to enhance vision. Before now, scientists presume that only humans cry “emotional” tears while all the other lesser species only cry as a result of irritation of the eyes. However, recent research has shown that animals do in fact cry.

Researchers have found that young mammals and birds cry with distress when they are separated from their mothers. Experts and hunters have both noted that the cries of a bear cub separated from its mother sounds very alike to a human baby's cry. The Dugong, the sea cow that lives in the Indian Ocean is known to cry immensely when in trouble or pain. Even baby rats have been known to cry when cold or fallen out of his nest. This brings the mother to the rescue and the fallen pup is back into the nest.

Donkeys have been known to cry as well. You could actually see tears drop and roll out from under its long eye lashes; see the trembling of its lips and the hunching of its shoulders as it is been burdened with loads by humans.

Perhaps, you have seen the cries of the bird left behind by the rest of the flock or monkey babies crying to their mothers when they are hungry or being weaned away from breast milk. For the monkeys, the mother monkey does initially respond to the distress call but as they respond less, the baby monkeys learn to depend less on their mothers and fend for themselves.

When an elephant dies, the entire group surrounds it and weep. When a baby elephant is hurt, the mother stays with it until help arrives or it gets well. Baby elephants in particular have been known to produce a very sad, keening sound.

Recent scientific research does show that spindle cells, which were once believed to exist only in humans and some other great apes, have been discovered in humpback whales, fin whales, killer whales and sperm whales in the same area of their brains as spindle cells in human brains. This brain region is linked with social organization, empathy and intuition about the feelings of others, as well as rapid gut reactions. Spindle cells are important in processing emotions. It’s likely that if we seek the presence of spindle cells in other animals we will find them.

Do animals cry? Of course they do. They appear to have feelings as well. All you need do is look into their eyes to know.

Sources:

http://indianapublicmedia.org/amomentofscience/do-other-animals-besides-humans-cry-2/

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070809165734AApmbm2

http://www.wisegeek.com/do-animals-cry.htm

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