9 Beautiful Waterfalls in West Java Province, Indonesia

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The mountainous area of West Java Province Indonesia or also known as the “Highland of Parahyangan” offers a number of scenic natural beauties. The beauty of the region had been recognized for centuries. Among such natural wonders are many waterf

West Java, a province located in the western part of Java Island had long been known for its natural beauty and resources. Due to its natural wonders the mountainous region of the province is named “Parahyangan”. “Hyang” is the local word for “God”; legend has it that the land was created when the God was smiling. Scattered on this highland are several waterfalls worth visiting.

Curug Cimahi, Bandung

Curug Cimahi is located twenty kilometers from Bandung, the capital city of West Java Province. “Curug” in local language means “waterfall” and “Cimahi” means “always enough water”. The waterfall was named “Curug Cimahi” because it never runs out of water in any season. The water from Cimahi River plunges vertically from a height of more than 80 meters, creating a deep plunge pool. The waterfall lies in a forested area of more than two hectares and is recognized as the one of the highest waterfalls in the province. The waterfall was first introduced as tourist destination in 1978. To reach the waterfall, visitors must hike a steep set of stoned stairs that can become very slippery during rainy season, for around ten minutes. The waterfall is surrounded by forest which is the natural habitat of several species of monkeys.  

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Curug Citambur, Cianjur

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Curug Citambur lies in the city of Cianjur, around 40 kilometers to the south of Bandung. The waterfall is easily accessible. From the main road, visitors only need to walk a short distance. Swimming is allowed but no one had ever tried it as the water is icy cold and because of the extremely high volume of the water. “Ci” is the local word for “water” and “tambur” means “drum”. The name “Citambur” means the water that sounds like drum. The name was given because the sound of water rushing across 40 meters resembles the rhythm of a drum. The waterfall is located in the middle of lush greeneries, mostly paddy field and tea plantation. Visitors could feel the splash of water 50 meters away from the waterfall.  

Cikundul, Cidenden and Cibereum Waterfalls

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Cikundul, Cidenden and Cibereum Waterfalls are situated inside Mount Gede Pangrango National Park, one of UNESCO’s World Network of Biosphere Reserves. Located in Cianjur, a city 100 kilometers to the west of Jakarta, Indonesia’s capital city, the national park and the waterfalls are popular tourist destination. The waterfalls are around one hour walk from the entrance up a steeply stoned path. Before reaching the waterfall, visitors must cross a 500 meters wooden bridge over a vast grassy swamp. Besides exploring the beauty of the waterfalls, visitors could also enjoy the serene atmosphere of the rainforest, birdsong, scenic rivers, the sight of a blue lagoon, and spectacular view of the twin volcanoes, Gede and Pangrango. If lucky, visitors could meet “owa jawa”, a species of endangered monkey endemic to the forest. The highest of the three and also the most visited is the Cikundul Waterfall. The most beautiful waterfall is the Cibereum. “Bereum” in local language means “red”. Cibereum Waterfall is red in color. Cidenden Waterfall sits between Cikundul and Cibereum.

Curug Cilember Waterfall, Cisarua

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Curug Cilember is located in Cisarua, a small town about two hours drive from Jakarta. The waterfall lies 800 meters above sea level. It is surrounded by forest which is a natural habitat of various species of tropical orchids and butterflies. A butterfly museum stands near the entrance. There are seven waterfalls on the site. The highest waterfall reaches 30 meters.  It takes almost three hours hike from the entrance to the farthest waterfall. The path is relatively wide and in good condition, however the one leading to the farthest waterfall is winding, narrow and very steep.

Curug Neglasari, Garut

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Situated in Garut, a city to the south of Bandung, the capital of West Java, Curug Neglasari lies in the middle of dense rainforest on the slope of Mount Gelap. “Gelap” is the local word for “lightning”. The name was given because of high frequency of lighning strikes in the area.  There are several waterfalls in the location but the most famous is the Curug Neglasari. After three hours drive from Garut and one kilometer walk from the entrance through green tea plantation, visitors could enjoy the beauty of this seven tiered waterfall. The waterfall reaches about 50 meters. Curug Neglasari or also known as Curug Limbung never runs out of water though the volume of water decreases during dry season.  

Curug Dago, Bandung

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Curug Dago is located not far from the centre of Bandung, the province’s capital city, but it is less popular compared to other waterfalls around the city due to its difficult access. The waterfall lies hidden in Dago Pakar Forest about 800 meters above sea level. The waterfall measures ten meters. The water comes from Cikapundung River, one of the main rivers in the province. Around the waterfall there are several caves and lakes. Near the waterfall, archeologist discovered ancient written stone from the King of Thailand who visited the waterfall in 1818.

Curug Sindulang Waterfalls, Sumedang

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Curug Sindulang is situated in Cinulang Village, Sumedang, a city about 38 kilometers east of Bandung. It takes around three hours drive from the centre of Sumedang. There are two separate waterfalls on the site. One reaches 50 meters while the other, located about 30 meters to the north of the first waterfall, plunges from the height of 15 meters. The location is opened for public in 1978. From the entrance visitors can drive or walk a three kilometers distance trough an up winding road and hike up a steeply stoned path to reach the waterfalls.

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