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What Causes Lint on Your Hairbrush, and How Do You Remove It?

My family doesn't have that problem, so why is it just me? I don't really use any products in my hair (and in fact, I've not noticed a difference between when I do or don't), and I wash my hair a few times a week.

Asked by Natasha Polak on Apr 28, 2010

10 Answers

Natasha Polak   L4: Guide   173 answers   +113 votes
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I do buy new ones, but I want to try and keep from spending money on them all the time! 

Posted on Apr 28, 2010
Katie   L2: Contributor   281 answers   +197 votes
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While you may not use hair products, is there someone who uses hairspray or even spray-on deodorant sharing your bathroom?  Anything aerosol will leave a small cloud of product that will settle on everything--including your hairbrush; when this dries it remains sticky, and attracts dust or balls up into lint-like clumps.  If you have two brushes, use a comb to remove the hair (a rat-tail comb can get under the hair and lift it out), then wash the brushes in very warm, soapy water, each brush scrubbing down into the other's bristles.  When clean, rinse thoroughly.

Posted on May 7, 2010
Natasha Polak   L4: Guide   173 answers   +113 votes
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Nope, no one else in the house uses any sprays or hair products - my husband shaves his head, and I don't usually apply more than a detangling serum in my daughter's curly hair, and not even in the same area of the house where I keep my hair brush.  I also do no share my brush.  And I will say that my daughter's hair brush does not end up like mine at all.  Even when we've used the same shampoos and conditioners, my brush is always the one to collect lint.  I guess I started noticing this several years ago, when I was a teen.  But back then, I had a dry scalp, and I definitely didn't use any hair products.  Over the years, I've used some hair sprays, mousse, and a serum for flyaways/frizz because my hair is very coarse.  My hair brush has still gotten to be the same every time.  I'd say it takes about a couple of months before the lint shows up, when it does, it is very noticeable.  It also doesn't matter if my hair is short or long and our home is a non-smoking household.  I can't think of anything else that can be the cause of this.  I'm interesting in hearing some other suggestions with the reasons behind this!

Posted on May 7, 2010
Lorie Spencer   L4: Guide   99 answers   +16 votes
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I recently had the same issue!  I figured out it was the lint from the new towels and threw away my brush and bought a new one.  I didn't realize what was doing it till I picked up a couple mint colored towels recently and started seeing the mint colored lint in my brush. lol  I felt really silly.

Posted on May 11, 2010
Jane Thomas   L2: Contributor   179 answers   +81 votes
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Consider purchasing a nice comb???

Posted on May 21, 2010
Yvette Brooks   L2: Contributor   13 answers   +9 votes
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Regardless if we use products in our hair or not we have natural oils from our scalp that is on every strand as it grows from the follicles which are all over your scalp. Your hair and your brush (like a broom or anything that is made up of strands) collects dust and/or particles easily. This is one of the reasons why we wash our hair.

I noticed you mention spending money so I want to share with you how I wash my brushes.

Since I am using it on my hair I want it to be clean and free of lint, etc. etc. I get a fine toothed comb and run it through my brush. Lifting any tangled hair out and anything else and throw it away. I do this until for the most part there isn't any hair in it. Then I put a dab of dish soap (any liquid soap will do) on my brush and create a lather with my comb and fingers. Then I fill the facebowl (bathroom sink) with warm /hot water and shake my brush in the water where all bristles are submerged. Then Let it dry on a towel. I have also, used this same method and instead of doing it manually, I applied the liquid soap and placed it in the washer on a very small load. Both methods do wonders. Try it out and let me know.

I clean my brush/brushes once a week. Keeping your brush clean equals treating your hair right. Smile

Posted on Aug 18, 2010
Natasha Polak   L4: Guide   173 answers   +113 votes
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thanks for all the comments!

Posted on Aug 18, 2010
Linda   L2: Contributor   68 answers   +16 votes
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I hate to be rude, but do you by an chance have dandruff? or psoriosis?  (I know i spelled that wrong!) I am the only one in my house who gets that lint as well, but then I do have dandruff. I have found that I cannot use those hair brushes that have the little balls or knobs at the end of the bristle, this prevents me from getting the lint off. When I do wash them I use my shampoo to do so as I have allergies and do not wish to take chances. Once the brush is clean I mix a bit of fabric softener in water, let the brush soak in it for about 10 minutes, then rinse it clean and let it dry. This helps to keep the lint from sticking to the brush base. I also use a comb to clean everything out. If you can find a hair brush that is either set in wood or has a rubber, not cloth, backing to hold the bristles this helps as well. If all else fails I have found that the 99cent store ( or dollar store) usually has good brushes that fit all the requirements and I will buy 3 or 4 at a time so that if one gets to where I cannot get it clean, then I trade it out for a new one.

You may be washing your hair to often and causing dry scalp that would cause the lint to be worse in your brush. I am not saying you should have dirty hair, just see what happens if you do not wash it so often.

Posted on Sep 26, 2011
Sandy Shannon   L3: Expert   420 answers   +312 votes
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Posted on Sep 26, 2011
Amanda Suazo   L1: Member   0 answers   +0 votes
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I came here to get an answer to the very same question.  I have had hairbrush lint for many, many years.  I do tend to have dry scalp, I do not use product in my hair, my family does not use product, either.  My hair does have a lot of volume to it naturally and I was wondering if the lint-in-the-hairbrush phenomenon has to do with the space between hairs and the occurence of fibers and dust particles in the air that are naturally there.  If the hair has enough oil on it maybe it would be enough to "catch" lint and dust particles- voila!- lint in the hairbrush.  Incidentally the lint in my hairbrush looks like the lint out of my dryer that is a little more cohesive (the oil.)  Well, anyway, that is what I was thinking.  Maybe... 

Posted on Apr 22, 2012

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