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Do Wolves Usually Attack People For No Reason Or Do They Not Attack People Most Of The Time?

I need help on this question.

Asked by Kayla Hess on Dec 7, 2010

8 Answers

suni51   L2: Contributor   1 answers   +3 votes
This answer has +3 votes  by

Wolves do not attack people most of the time, as they keep a distance from man folk unless they have really no alternate but to attack. Wolves are actually used to feed on the left-overs of the kills by the other animals like tigers and lions, therefore do not go for hunting bigger targets.

They may however attack, when in group and out for hunting for food, in case they do not find any leftovers. 

Posted on Dec 8, 2010
Michael Smoker   L2: Contributor   17 answers   +42 votes
This answer has +2 votes  by

Wolves, like most wild animals, are shy of people. If they spot a human they tend to flee. They MAY attack a small human, such as a child, if there are many wolves and they are desperately hungry.

Also, wolves have an epigenetic trait that requires them to hunt their prey using a sequence of certain steps. If this sequence is interrupted, they are psychologically unable to continue hunting. Thus it is often enough for a person to see a stalking wolf and make it clear s/he has seen the wolf, and the wolf becomes unable to hunt the person any longer.

Posted on Dec 8, 2010
Daryl Putnam   L3: Expert   47 answers   +27 votes
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There has never been a documented case of a healthy, wild wolf killing a human in North America. Contrary to the wild stories, and the out right prevarications, wolves are not a threat to humans. Although wolves are large, reaching 120 - 130 pounds, they are timid and shy animals that prefer to avoid contact with people. Wolves are creatures of the wilderness and are only found in a few western states and National parks outside of Canada and Alaska. There is no way of knowing whether, under unusual circumstanses, a wolf pack would attack a human, large or small, for food. As with all animals, humans includeded, hunger or the threat of harm could cause abnormal behavior.


Posted on Dec 8, 2010
Epic Strategist   L3: Expert   219 answers   +46 votes
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I've written an article in response to this question:

Who's Afraid of a Big Bad Wolf?

Are wolves view humans as potential food, or something to run away from? — continue reading...

Posted on Dec 9, 2010
Marty Hanson   L2: Contributor   4 answers   +2 votes
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Aggressive wolves in Alaska village to be killed
by Mary Pemberton / Associated Press Fairbanks Daily News Miner
Dec 08, 2010 | 773 views | 5 5 comments | | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
ANCHORAGE, Alaska - State officials have approved a plan for the aerial shooting of wolves that have killed pets and scared residents in and near Port Heiden.

The plan was approved after the Alaska Peninsula community appealed to the state for help with three wolf packs that have been killing pets and are becoming increasingly bold around humans. The wolves pose a threat to the town, public safety and wildlife officials said.

The wolf-killing operation was to begin immediately. Pilots under contract with the agencies were already in Port Heiden, trooper spokeswoman Megan Peters said Wednesday.

The hungry wolves have killed five dogs and two cats, including two dogs recently. While they mostly come into town at night, the wolves also have been seen during the day.

Port Heiden Mayor Scott Anderson said he welcomed the help: "We sure don't want to lose nobody," he said.

He also said the village doesn't want to lose any more pets.

Department of Public Safety Commissioner Joseph Masters said the wolves would be killed as quickly as possible in a coordinated effort. The plan was to back-trail wolf tracks to locate the animals that have been involved in incidents in the village.

The operation will involve fixed-wing aircraft and pilots under contract with the two agencies, said Bruce Dale, the Department of Fish and Game's area supervisor. He said shooters most likely will be department employees.

The exact number of wolves involved in the attacks on dogs and cats in the town was not known, but residents have reported three packs with anywhere from seven to 20 animals.

"The frequency, aggressive nature, and number of wolves involved in the attacks is unacceptable from a public safety standpoint," said Lem Butler, Fish and Game's area biologist in King Salmon.

Butler flew to the community on Monday afternoon to gather information on the wolf attacks.

Residents say wolves have come into Port Heiden before looking for food, but not in these numbers. They report that the half dozen wolves killed in recent months by residents are skinny.

The situation has residents scared and thinking about what occurred in the village of Chignik Lake, another Alaska Peninsula town, last March: A teacher out jogging was killed by two hungry wolves.

Dale said the Port Heiden situation was serious.

"We will take out any wolves we can link to incidents in the village," he said.

Copyright 2010 Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. All rights reserved.
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comments (5)
« MP210 wrote on Thursday, Dec 09 at 05:48 AM »
Not to mention the fecal matter, and the brown spots on my lawn from pet uriNation
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« MP210 wrote on Thursday, Dec 09 at 05:45 AM »
I agree with the removal of pets. Wish I had some wolves around my house. I can't go in my yard without the constant barking of my neighbors dog. The other neighbors dog doesn't bark as much, but it's always checking out whats on my porch.
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« Larmex wrote on Thursday, Dec 09 at 05:20 AM »
I can hear them now, ALASKA murders wolves, do not vist Alaska they are killers..
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« Yota99714 wrote on Wednesday, Dec 08 at 09:46 PM »
Agreed. OR keep everyone inside long enough for the wolves to start eating each other. That used to happen too.
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« PMcGraw wrote on Wednesday, Dec 08 at 06:58 PM »
While I agree with the removal of these wolves I disagree with the state doing it. The people that live in Port Heiden should handle it. Trap, fly and shoot. I know it is dark but one that lives in the bush should be able to take care of themselves and not ask for the Government to save them. Keep your pets and children inside for now and get with the program.

Pat
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Read more: Fairbanks Daily News-Miner - Aggressive wolves in Alaska village to be killed

Posted on Dec 9, 2010
Barbara Sonja Biller   L3: Expert   529 answers   +436 votes
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Animals are very sensitive, example, if a group of partiers were in a cabin, the wolves could hear them, so if someone said something in an aggressive tone, than the wolves might copy this thinking they would get invited to the party.

Posted on Dec 9, 2010
Barbara Sonja Biller   L3: Expert   529 answers   +436 votes
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Nobody likes being invited to a party that says they are serving something and then realize there isn't anything, thus leading to hunger.  Very important to respect guests.  Hopefully the wolves have heard this advice so they stop attacking people.

Posted on Dec 9, 2010
Barbara Sonja Biller   L3: Expert   529 answers   +436 votes
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I have unfortunately witnessed the slaughter of animals, what do you think other animals are thinking when they see this?  No wonder the other animals in the barn busted out and ran away.  Maybe they are feeling the same way a human might, I still have difficulty eating things that looked like my friends, I trust animals more than humans most times.

Posted on Dec 9, 2010

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